theenergyissue

theenergyissue:

Oil Tanker Surfing

Massive oil tankers, which began traversing the Gulf of Mexico during the Texas Oil Boom in the early 1900s, have turned Galveston Bay into an unlikely surf break. The large ships create waves that can be a mile long, providing an unusually long ride for surfers. James Fulbright, one of the pioneers of so-called “tanker surfing,” brought attention to the phenomenon almost 20 years ago when he and his friends were features in Dana Brown’s surf film, Step into Liquid. Now, it has evolved into a thriving subculture. Photographer and surfer Kenny Braun, who has documented this community of surfers in his book Surf Texas, described the surprisingly ideal wave conditions in Slate:

"For tanker surfing, Galveston Bay is perfectly shaped geographically. Fully loaded oil tankers come steaming in at full speed and travel approximately 30 miles before entering the Houston Ship Channel. The ship’s wake produces a beautiful shoulder high wave that can be ridden for 20 minutes. The average ocean wave ride is 20 seconds.” 

Tanker surfing, a sport that directly stems from the expansion of global fossil fuel production and trade, highlights the ways in which culture and communities are intimately tied with energy. In this case, the phenomenon is an inspiring example of how culture might evolve in surprising ways and disrupt the way we think about energy going forward. 

npr
nprfreshair:

FXX is going to have a 12-day Simpsons marathon, playing all 552 episodes.  In appreciation of the series, we’ve compiled several of our Simpsons interviews into one show. 
Since The Simpsons began, Fresh Air’s Terry Gross has interviewed many people who have had a hand creating the show – from Matt Groening in 1989 and 2003 to  two of the writers Al Jean and Mike Reiss in 1992. Gross also talked with actors who do the voices, including Nancy Cartwright, who plays Bart, in 2007; Julie Kavner, the voice of Marge in 1994; Hank Azaria, the voice of Moe, Apu, Chief Wiggum and others in 2004.
Here, Simpsons creator Matt Groening tells Terry about how they occasionally got in trouble with the Fox network: 

"At the beginning, virtually anything we did would get somebody upset and now it seems like the people who are eager to be offended — and this country is full of people who are eager to be offended. They’ve given up on our show. We got into trouble a few years ago for — Homer is watching an anti-drinking commercial and it said, "Warning! Beer causes rectal cancer." And Homer responds by saying, "Mmm beer." Fox didn’t want us to do that because beer advertisers are a big part of the Fox empire and it turns out the writer was able to track down the actual fact where some studies show that indeed it does — or did or has a tendency to [cause cancer] — so we were able to keep it in."

Photo: Courtesy of Fox 

nprfreshair:

FXX is going to have a 12-day Simpsons marathon, playing all 552 episodes.  In appreciation of the series, we’ve compiled several of our Simpsons interviews into one show. 

Since The Simpsons began, Fresh Air’s Terry Gross has interviewed many people who have had a hand creating the show – from Matt Groening in 1989 and 2003 to  two of the writers Al Jean and Mike Reiss in 1992. Gross also talked with actors who do the voices, including Nancy Cartwright, who plays Bart, in 2007; Julie Kavner, the voice of Marge in 1994; Hank Azaria, the voice of Moe, Apu, Chief Wiggum and others in 2004.

Here, Simpsons creator Matt Groening tells Terry about how they occasionally got in trouble with the Fox network: 

"At the beginning, virtually anything we did would get somebody upset and now it seems like the people who are eager to be offended — and this country is full of people who are eager to be offended. They’ve given up on our show. We got into trouble a few years ago for — Homer is watching an anti-drinking commercial and it said, "Warning! Beer causes rectal cancer." And Homer responds by saying, "Mmm beer." Fox didn’t want us to do that because beer advertisers are a big part of the Fox empire and it turns out the writer was able to track down the actual fact where some studies show that indeed it does — or did or has a tendency to [cause cancer] — so we were able to keep it in."

Photo: Courtesy of Fox 

ride2conquercancer
ride2conquercancer:Cancer can be beaten and some of the people who have fought hard for this dream were honoured Tuesday night.

A Hall of Fame ceremony was held for outstanding riders and team leaders of the past seven years of the Ride to Conquer Cancer at the Princess Margaret Cancer Research Centre in Toronto.
 (via Ride to Conquer Cancer starts hall of fame | Toronto & GTA | News | Toronto Sun)
CT’s a hall of famer. I’m a proud son.

ride2conquercancer:

Cancer can be beaten and some of the people who have fought hard for this dream were honoured Tuesday night.

A Hall of Fame ceremony was held for outstanding riders and team leaders of the past seven years of the Ride to Conquer Cancer at the Princess Margaret Cancer Research Centre in Toronto.
(via Ride to Conquer Cancer starts hall of fame | Toronto & GTA | News | Toronto Sun)

CT’s a hall of famer. I’m a proud son.